Why more asylum seeker boats are REALLY heading to Australia and the lies told to refugees

An economic crisis and smugglers’ lies about a life in Australia are the reasons Sri Lankan refugee boats are coming here, not a change of government, a lawyer representing asylum seekers has said.

As the island nation grapples with an economic emergency, resulting in critical food and fuel shortages, desperate locals believe they can simply travel to Australia to start a new life, the human rights lawyer has said. the man Lakshan Dias.

But it was possible the smugglers had been “emboldened” by the change in government, said a former Australian bureaucrat.

An economic crisis and smugglers’ lies about a life in Australia are the reason the Sri Lankan refugee boats are arriving, not a change of government, a lawyer representing asylum seekers (pictured, trawlers) has claimed fishing boats are anchored in the Sri Lankan fishing port of Negombo)

As the island nation grapples with an economic emergency, desperate locals believe they will be allowed to start a new life in Australia, said human rights lawyer Lakshan Dias (pictured, Tamils and Sri Lankan Muslims sit in a navy patrol boat after they were rescued and brought to a naval base in Galle)

As the island nation grapples with an economic emergency, desperate locals believe they will be allowed to start a new life in Australia, said human rights lawyer Lakshan Dias (pictured, Tamils and Sri Lankan Muslims sit in a navy patrol boat after they were rescued and brought to a naval base in Galle)

Abul Rizvi, a former deputy secretary at Australia’s immigration department, said it was “reasonable to suspect” economic difficulties in Sri Lanka and curiosity about the position of the new government were the reasons.

“The smugglers want to test the new government and they have more than enough people who are in dire straits to want to participate,” Rizvi said. 9 newspapers.

Asylum seekers coming to Australia have been a highly politicized issue in recent years.

On the morning of Australia’s federal election, the Liberal Party informed voters that an “illegal” boat intercepted by Border Force officers had attempted to enter Australia.

The 12 people on board, all Sri Lankans from Negombo, were apprehended near Christmas Island and deported.

Asylum seekers coming to Australia have been a highly politicized issue in recent years.  Pictured: An asylum seeker boat in 2013 off Christmas Island

Asylum seekers coming to Australia has been a highly politicized issue in recent years

There has been speculation that smugglers may feel empowered, a new Labor government will be more lenient towards asylum seekers

There has been speculation that smugglers may feel empowered, a new Labor government will be more lenient towards asylum seekers

An unsolicited text message has been sent to residents urging them to vote Liberal

An unsolicited text message has been sent to residents urging them to vote Liberal

Since then, another Sri Lankan fishing boat with 15 people on board has been recovered by Australian Border Force, while three larger boats have been captured by the country’s navy.

At least one of them has been set on fire, a common tactic smugglers use in hopes they will be allowed to stay.

There has been speculation that the smugglers may feel empowered that the new Labor government will be more lenient towards asylum seekers.

But new Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has promised his government will continue to turn away boats.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has promised his government will continue to turn away boats

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has promised his government will continue to turn away boats

Protests have rocked Sri Lanka for two months, calling for the president's resignation over his failure to deal with the economic crisis

Protests have rocked Sri Lanka for two months, calling for the president’s resignation over his alleged failure to deal with the economic crisis

Claims by asylum seekers that Mr Albanese’s government could be softer have been challenged in Sri Lanka.

According to Sri Lankans, the main reason this is happening is the desperation felt by young Sri Lankans in particular, as well as the promises made by smugglers that Australia would take them in.

The combined effects of the pandemic and the Sri Lankan government’s alleged economic mismanagement have led to 39% inflation and critical shortages of food, fuel, medicine, imported goods and even fertilizer.

Protests have rocked Sri Lanka for two months, with calls for the president’s resignation over his alleged failure to deal with the economic crisis.

Mr Dias, who was representing 76 asylum seekers deported from Australia in a court in Colombo in May, said Sri Lankans were desperate to get here and were being encouraged by others.

He said life has become so difficult in Sri Lanka that boats full of refugees “are not going to stop” heading for Australian territories, Australian weekend reported.

Mr Dias said asylum seekers were once seen as ‘traitors’ for wanting to reach Australia, but conditions are now so bad in Sri Lanka that ‘everyone’ is saying ‘you have to’ go to Australia. Australia.

The Sri Lankan Navy has admitted that it apprehends at least one boat a week bound for Australia.

One of the men deported after he was intercepted on a Sri Lankan fishing boat on Christmas Island on Thursday June 9, Sadish Kumar, 20, admitted to heading to Australia to find work.

His father, Ramalingam Kumar, explained the intolerable situation in which his son and so many young Sri Lankans find themselves.

“There is no food he likes to eat, no fuel for his bike and no work to earn. Who would live in this country? he said.

Another of the young men on board, Eranga Madhushan, also 20, said he expected to be sent to a “refugee camp”.

A human rights lawyer says asylum seekers were once seen as

A human rights lawyer says asylum seekers were once considered ‘traitors’ because they wanted to reach Australia, but now conditions are so bad in Sri Lanka that ‘everyone’ says “you have to” go to Australia.

Emmanuel Stephen admitted he was

Emmanuel Stephen has admitted he was ‘fool’ for letting his son Emmanuel Mahesh and other men, aged between 20 and 30 – all of whom were deported – buy his boat, which was intercepted by border forces May 9.

Others said they believed the Australian government would accept them because the Sri Lankan government could not find them jobs or “a plan for our future”.

The man who sold the intercepted trawler to smugglers admitted selling it because he couldn’t escape his debts.

Emmanuel Stephen has confessed he was a “fool” for letting his son Emmanuel Mahesh and other men, aged between 20 and 30 – all of whom were deported – buy his boat.

Mahesh, 30, who is a young married father, appeared in court in Colombo and was released next week to face serious criminal charges as the alleged owner of the boat.

His father refused previous offers from smugglers to buy his trawler, hoping to get out of his financial difficulties, but high fuel prices and crew shortages overwhelmed him with his debt problems.

He accepted the offer to sell his boat and denied it had anything to do with the change in Australian government.

Possessing money at “several banks” and with his house and boat mortgaged, he needed the cash.

The smugglers promised to pay $19,700, but could only find $13,800, promising to pay the rest when they arrived.

But they were intercepted at Christmas Island and deported.

“I nearly had a heart attack when I heard Australian Border Control had stopped the boat with my son. I was a fool to give my boat to these people,” said Emmanuel Stephen.

He claimed to have tried to send his son to Australia legally, but was unsuccessful.

An Australian Border Force spokesperson said the department does not comment on operational matters.

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