Arrival of asylum seekers by canoe or vehicle

asylum

Asylum seekers arriving in dinghies or vehicles will be electronically tagged

  • As part of a Home Office trial, some people arriving in the UK on small boats or the back of lorries will be electronically tagged.
  • The 12-month trial will assess whether electronic monitoring is an effective way to provide immigration bond.
  • It is part of the government’s crackdown on people entering the country through “unnecessary and risky means”.

As part of a Home Office trial, some people arriving in the UK on small boats or the back of lorries will be electronically tagged.

The 12-month trial, which began on Wednesday, will assess whether electronic monitoring is an effective way to provide immigration bail to asylum seekers, the government says.

It is part of the government’s crackdown on people entering the country through “unnecessary and risky means”.

The Home Office aims to end the unethical business model of people smugglers who place their passengers in risky situations.

However, advocates argue that criminalizing refugees based on their means of entry is ineffective and violates the idea of ​​asylum.

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) issued an injunction on Tuesday, ending a deportation trip to Rwanda.

Read more: Priti Patel said: ‘We are committed to the asylum plan’

Britain has struck a deal with the East African country, giving £120m for economic development in return for taking in ‘illegal’ asylum seekers.

The UK has also pledged to expel Rwanda’s “most vulnerable refugee populations” if they cannot be adequately housed there.

The “totally shameful” involvement of the ECHR, according to Home Secretary Priti Patel, was politically motivated.

Meanwhile, Justice Secretary Dominic Raab has hinted that new legislation could allow the government to simply ignore temporary orders issued by the Strasbourg court.

According to the BBC, the first people to be tagged under the bail scheme were likely people who had escaped deportation to Rwanda.

Read more: As legal challenges fail, UK PM defends Rwandan asylum system

The trial, according to the Home Office, will see whether the marking facilitates regular communication with those released and advances their claims more successfully.

Those who have been marked will be required to report regularly to authorities, may be subject to a curfew or barred from particular areas, and failure to do so could result in their detention or prosecution.

It comes after new figures indicated that the number of migrants crossing the Channel to reach the UK this year exceeded 11,000 for the first time.

According to Ministry of Defense figures, the Border Force or RNLI brought 11,092 people ashore after being rescued from small boats in the English Channel, the world’s busiest maritime waterway.

On four small boats, 146 people were transported to the United Kingdom.

Read more: UK judge allows government to start sending asylum seekers to Rwanda

After hitting a high of 444 on Tuesday, the daily number gradually declined throughout the week. Since 562, it was the highest number.

At least 48 people were brought ashore in Dover on Thursday, including women, children and adult men.

Warm weather and calm seas this week may have caused an increase in attempted crossings.

With 13 days remaining in June, the number of people crossing the English Channel is almost double that of last year at this time. By the end of June 2021, a total of 5,911 people had crossed the border that year.

According to analyses, 341 boats have been used to cross the English Channel so far this year, with an average of 32 passengers on board each.

Comments are closed.